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Workplace violence prevention: OSHA looks to states for input, models

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May 4, 2017

Donna Gross clocked out for a dinner break one Saturday evening in 2010, and she never clocked back in. The 54-year-old psychiatric technician, who had worked for 14 years at Napa State Hospital in California, was found dead in a courtyard at work, strangled by one of her patients. The case prompted reforms to curb workplace violence not only at the local healthcare facility, but at the state level as well. Now the federal government is asking whether it should follow California’s lead.

Donna Gross clocked out for a dinner break one Saturday evening in 2010, and she never clocked back in. The 54-year-old psychiatric technician, who had worked for 14 years at Napa State Hospital in California, was found dead in a courtyard at work, strangled by one of her patients. The case prompted reforms to curb workplace violence not only at the local healthcare facility, but at the state level as well. Now the federal government is asking whether it should follow California’s lead.



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