This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login, subscribe, or try out HSC for 30 days.

Avoid violence in the emergency department

PRINT THIS PAGE | RETURN TO ARTICLE

January 1, 2009

Ask any hospital safety director and they will tell you violence in the ED is becoming an increasingly larger problem. The reason behind this is simple. The combination of long waits, a large population of uninsured patients, and the extreme stress that often accompanies ED visits creates a pressure cooker of high anxiety. Tempers flare and violence or threatening behavior ensues.

“Let me put it this way,” says Anthony N. Potter, CHE, CHPA-F, CPP, FAAFS, director of public safety at Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC. “Every officer that I have had injured since I have been here—and that’s five years—has been injured in the ED.”

Ask any hospital safety director and they will tell you violence in the ED is becoming an increasingly larger problem. The reason behind this is simple. The combination of long waits, a large population of uninsured patients, and the extreme stress that often accompanies ED visits creates a pressure cooker of high anxiety. Tempers flare and violence or threatening behavior ensues. “Let me put it this way,” says Anthony N. Potter, CHE, CHPA-F, CPP, FAAFS, director of public safety at Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC. “Every officer that I have had injured since I have been here—and that’s five years—has been injured in the ED.”



This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login, subscribe, or try out HSC for 30 days.



Copyright © 2020. Hospital Safety Center.