Home
 
Login  
About Hospital Safety Center  
Career Center  
Contact Us
 
Subscribe  
       Free Resources
Hospital Safety Insider
E-Newsletter

 
Mac's Safety Space  
        News & Analysis
Healthcare Safety Leader  
Environment of Care Leader  
Forms and Checklists Library  

 

 

     
This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe.

Building a compliant sharps exception ­process

EMAIL THIS STORY | PRINT THIS STORY | SUBSCRIBE | ARCHIVES

November 1, 2012

In November 2000, the Needlestick Safety and ­Prevention Act (NSPA) was passed by the federal government. The act, which was adopted by OSHA under its Bloodborne Pathogens standard several months later, requires employers to identify, evaluate, and implement safer medical devices, and to keep a sharps injury log in an effort to reduce the number of healthcare workers that were being exposed to bloodborne pathogens from accidental sharps injuries.

In November 2000, the Needlestick Safety and ­Prevention Act (NSPA) was passed by the federal government. The act, which was adopted by OSHA under its Bloodborne Pathogens standard several months later, requires employers to identify, evaluate, and implement safer medical devices, and to keep a sharps injury log in an effort to reduce the number of healthcare workers that were being exposed to bloodborne pathogens from accidental sharps injuries.



This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe.

Subscribe Now!
Sign up for our free e-newsletter
About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement | Contact Us
Copyright © 2020. Hospital Safety Center.